7 WAYS TO PREVENT CONTRACTING CORONAVIRUS

I realized after my last blog post that while I did address the myths of coronavirus and the fact that there is no need for panic and chaos to ensue, I didn’t really say anything helpful to you (other than reasons to not freak out).

Now that I’ve thoroughly researched what is public knowledge about the virus, it’s time to prepare in the best way that my loved ones and I can.

My mom forwarded me a post written by a doctor friend on Facebook, and I found the tips within it to be pretty helpful.

Note that my tips below are also helpful when thinking about the flu or cold viruses (which are more common)

Therefore, to match my 7 myths about coronavirus post, here’s my 7 ways to help prevent contracting and spreading coronavirus:

TIP #1: DO NOT HANDSHAKE OR HIGH FIVE

Save it for another time. You can fist bump or air high-five, but direct contact with someone else’s hands is just not a good idea. We use our hands for EVERYTHING, and they come into contact with our eyes, nose, and mouth far more than we realize each day.

TIP #2: DON’T TOUCH PUBLIC OBJECTS WITH YOUR HANDS

Think about how many people touch light switches, gas pumps, shopping carts, credit card pads, doorknobs, door handles, etc. Avoid touching public objects as much as you can. It’s a smart idea to wear disposable gloves for things like pumping gas, use a tissue as a barrier between touching a doorknob and your hands, or switch off the lights with your knuckle instead. If you have to touch something, be sure to wash hands immediately afterwards.

TIP #3: WIPE DOWN EVERYTHING

Stock up on hand wipes and chlorox wipes whenever you can. Nightly, I’ve been wiping down all the common areas in my house so that everything will be clean in the morning (I usually do all doorknobs, light switches, remotes, faucet handles, toilet handles, and anything else you normally touch throughout the day). It’s also worth mentioning that you should be wiping down the child seat in grocery store carts as well as gym equipment you’re using.

TIP #4: WASH YOUR HANDS. WASH YOUR HANDS. WASH YOUR HANDS.

This one is SO obvious but it so crucial to you not getting sick. You need to be washing your hands at least hourly and EVERY SINGLE TIME you get back from a public space. Wash them for 20 seconds with soap- my roommates and I like to sing the ABC’s together when we partake in this activity. If you have no access to soap and water, use a hand sanitizer with 60% or greater alcohol base. It’s also worth mentioning to NOT use air dryers for drying your hands. They simply recycle the air particles in the room and put them right back on your hands- so use a paper towel, shake them dry, or rub them on your clothes if need be. Get into the habit of this if you haven’t already -it will become routine quicker than you’d think.

TIP #5: DON’T COUGH OR SNEEZE INTO YOUR ELBOW

If you can help it, cough or sneeze into a disposable tissue and throw it away promptly. When you sneeze or cough into the clothing on your elbow, it has a possibility of staying there and active for a week or more afterwards.

TIP #6: TAKE ZINC LOZENGES

Zinc helps prevent viruses from multiplying in your throat once they’re there. Use especially when you feel cold symptoms coming on. Lie down when taking it and let the lozenge take its time dissolving in the back of your throat.   Cold-EEZE is a popular brand that contains zinc if you’re looking for recommendations.

TIP #7: WORRY ABOUT OTHERS

Remember, your actions don’t just affect you, they affect those around you and they might not have as good as an immune system (young children, the elderly, people with asthma . Take whatever precautions you can- I hope everyone stays well during this time.

Art of the day: On the subject of gloves, “A Mixture of Frailties” by Susie MacMurry I don’t think I would ever wear this dress but I have to say, it is pretty creative. Here she uses surgical gloves to make a statement on the feminine silhouette and the traditional work expected of women.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *